Why does the Chinese exam system not allow you to use an interpreter

Posted November 04, 2018 09:17:46In China, the use of an interpreter for Chinese language and examination is prohibited.

It is only allowed when the test is administered in a Chinese language setting and there are no foreign examiners present.

This means that students cannot use an English-speaking translator.

According to the Department of State, in 2017, there were more than 50,000 foreign students studying in China.

The official Xinhua News Agency reported that the Department is now reviewing the policies surrounding use of interpreters in order to make sure they are available for foreign students.

However, there is currently no specific guidance for use of non-English speaking foreign students in China, and it is unclear how many students are being asked to sign an interpreter consent form.

A recent news article in the Beijing Times revealed that foreign students are not allowed to speak with Chinese examiners in Chinese schools or in schools and universities in the country, including in Beijing and Shanghai.

This is the first time that Chinese students have been asked to register an interpreter to participate in Chinese examinations.

The article also noted that China’s foreign students do not have a legal right to speak to foreign examinators at all, as foreign students may only be asked to provide an interpreter when required by the local government.

According the article, Chinese students can request that a foreign examiner not speak with them in Chinese, but foreign examers have to provide a written agreement before the Chinese government can legally ask a foreign student to speak.

China has been one of the most vocal countries in the international debate about the use and misuse of interpreter consent forms, and the Chinese Government has been the most aggressive in demanding the removal of the form.

The form, which was created by the Chinese Ministry of Education in 2010, was made compulsory for Chinese students to take the Chinese National Board of Education exams.

As of October 2018, the form was still in place, but not mandatory.

According to China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, there are now only seven approved foreign interpreters.

The United States, the European Union, Canada, and Australia are among the countries that do not require the use or misuse of an interpreter form.

In addition, the United States Department of Education, which administers the English-language examinations, does not require an interpreter form in any of its courses.